Hide in Time


Fiction - Time Travel
286 Pages
Reviewed on 01/28/2021
Buy on Amazon

Author Biography

I was born in England but lived in New Zealand for some years. Wonderful country, wonderful people. From there I spent four years in central Africa on a bush mission comprising a hospital, school, farm and leprosarium. This was a very interesting and useful experience where I learnt a lot about myself and enjoyed the company of people from all over the world, as well as the delightful Africans. Africa dragged my love of writing to the surface. Living some forty miles from the nearest tarmac road, I soon ran out of bedtime stories for the children. Scribbling began. On returning to England, fiction took a back seat as real life took over – mostly feeding the mortgage. I worked in finance and psychiatry for many years and part time, I arranged social events for single people, just like Laura does in my first novel, Hide in Time.
I have also written and read for the BBC.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Hayley Haun for Readers' Favorite

In Hide in Time by Anna Faversham, Laura Yager is not who she seems, or rather, from where. Laura is shipwrecked in the 21st century—literally. Romance is on her side, despite the spurned fiancé she left behind in 1814. Matt Redfern is there for her from day one of her new life in the modern age. He never questions why she showed up when she did or how, but it's clear there is much more to it than meets the eye. Five years later, Xandra Radcliffe falls into Laura’s life and falls out just as quickly, changing the dynamic forever. A writer and lover of the past, Xandra finds herself in a bit of trouble. After she helps stop a robbery, a gang puts a hit on her. There is nowhere left to run except back to 1814 and into the arms of Laura’s ex-fiancé, Adam Leigh-Fox.

Looking for the classic dashing gentlemen, roguish highwaymen, damsels, and heroines? Look no further than Hide in Time by Anna Faversham. Hide in Time resonates with readers who feel out of time, who need a little fantasy in their lives to get through the day. Faversham’s writing is clear and straightforward. No fluff required. Transitions are quick and painless as readers traverse from the Georgian to the modern eras. In addition to one woman traveling back, another travels forward. Both points of view add to the novel as a whole. Without one, you would not have a complete story. It is imperative that characters make a book, and Faversham’s do just that. One woman’s past is another woman’s future. Everything comes together in one neat bundle. No one likes to have a story finish without closure!