How to Make Compost


Non-Fiction - Home/Crafts
52 Pages
Reviewed on 04/26/2013
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Author Biography

Renée Benzaim was born in Wenatchee, Washington, but grew up in California. She attended college in Modesto and Turlock in California and in Dover, Delaware. When she lived in Hawaii, she took her Paralegal training for 18 months and then returned to California after a 10 years absence, and worked for many years as a Paralegal in California's Central Valley.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Martina Svyantek for Readers' Favorite

“How to Make Compost” written by Renee Benzaim is a good introductory guide into the world of compost. This mini-guide explains many different methods that can be employed to create compost in both indoor and outdoor settings. The many benefits of composting are the first things mentioned; the price (it is free!), the availability (it is for anyone!), and the adaptability (it can be indoor or outdoor!). There are many chapters listed in the book that discuss approaches that might be new to most readers looking to make compost – such as worm compost, compost tea, mushroom compost, urban composting, and bokashi.

I found it very enjoyable to learn about these alternative composting methods. Each method is explained in such detail that a novice compost maker could start trying out these new methods right away. One section that might be particularly important to those living in colder climates is the advice on how to extend what the author refers to as the “compost season.” This section also includes information that would be useful to those composting indoors, as it advocates methods that do not take up much space. After reading this book, I began imagining all the different tucked-away spaces that I could use in my own home to start composting the coffee grounds, fruit and veggie scraps, and egg shells that my family currently just throw away. There are some very informative links posted at the end of the book, including some to YouTube videos with instructions on how to construct worm bins and compost bins; I think I will use these to try to make my own system as it now seems so simple!