Letting Go


Fiction - Womens
236 Pages
Reviewed on 02/06/2014
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Belinda Tors is a retired social worker and journalist who has published widely in newspapers and literary journals. Under the name Barbara Fifield, she is the author of two women's novels, "Photographs and Memories" and "Lucifer Romance," a paranormal romance. She has also published a self-illustrated book of poetry, "Passion's Evidence." She is a member of several writing groups, including the Florida Writers' Association, the Tomoka Poets, and the Ormond Beach Writers' League. She is currently working on a memoir about her army brat childhood. Ms. Tors resides in Port Orange, Florida.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Maria Beltran for Readers' Favorite

Belinda Tors’ novel, Letting Go, is the story of Margery Arturo, a mother of two who has an abusive relationship with her husband. After twenty years, she finally finds the courage to leave him and start a new life. Paradoxically, she finds a job as a counselor at a women's shelter. Settling into an apartment with her daughter Lola, Margery starts to pick up the pieces of her life. But she has to tie the many loose ends of her broken marriage and at the same time find her own happiness and fulfillment. Margery meets Fred, a divorcee, and she starts to love again. She is also confronted with the trouble in her sister’s marriage and the task of raising two children who are fast growing up. Like many women who go through an abusive relationship, Margery struggles to put her life in order. Can she risk going into a relationship again?

Letting Go gives us a picture of a woman who finds herself trapped in an abusive marriage. Author Belinda Tors chronicles the life of Margery Arturo as she suffers for twenty years in an abusive relationship. Financially dependent on her husband, and having two growing children, it takes a lot of courage for Margery to finally free herself from the relationship. Fortunately, she finds the courage to stand on her own. What sends a chill down my spine is that there are a lot of women out there who continue to suffer in their relationships. The most important lesson from this book is for women not to be scared to break out of an abusive relationship. After she left her husband, Margery’s journey is not very easy, but things eventually look up. And the most important thing is that in the end, she learns to stand on her own and course her own destiny.

Belinda Tors

Marie Beltran accurately describes what it is like for an abused woman to try to leave her abuser, especially if she has children. Many women attempt to leave their abusers several times before they finally succeed in doing so. The main character, Margery Arturo, is one of those who finally make it. Ms. Beltran has done a good portrayal of how the protaganist in the novel succeeds.