Love & Darts


Fiction - General
282 Pages
Reviewed on 06/18/2012
Buy on Amazon

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Author Biography

Best New American Voices nominee Nath Jones received an MFA in creative writing from Northwestern University. Her publishing credits include PANK Magazine, There Are No Rules, and Sailing World. She lives and writes in Chicago.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Lee Ashford for Readers' Favorite

“Love & Darts” by Nath Jones is one of the volumes in her “On Impulse” eBook series. The series covers a broad range of themes. The stories in this volume also cover a spectrum of topics, from the suicide of a teen who failed to secure the college scholarship which would allow him to play basketball (how could he devastate his parents that way?); to discussing whose family Christmas traditions will be adopted for their new family. Will they continue Dan’s family’s tradition of driving to a tree farm every year, or will they adopt Marie’s family’s tradition of a gaudily decorated artificial tree that never sheds a needle on the carpet?

There are 24 tales in this collection. My reaction to them was as varied as the tales. I think that response is to be expected from a collection of diverse short stories, and I imagine that is how most readers will respond. The stories are concise, often telling the tale more by what they don’t say, than by what they do say. In spite of the variety of topics they cover, it is surprisingly easy to accept each tale as somebody’s true life experience. I don’t think anybody could actually “enjoy” reading about a suicide, or about a teen driver killed driving drunk, or about a homosexual attending his father’s funeral, who can’t feel any “dead dad grief, but is happy his father will never learn about his sexual orientation. These are not stories to enjoy; rather, they are stories to experience. They are stories of life lived.