Pride of the Bluegrass


Children - Adventure
336 Pages
Reviewed on 05/23/2021
Buy on Amazon

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Review Exchange Program, which is open to all authors and is completely free. Simply put, you agree to provide an honest review an author's book in exchange for the author doing the same for you. What sites your reviews are posted on (B&N, Amazon, etc.) and whether you send digital (eBook, PDF, Word, etc.) or hard copies of your books to each other for review is up to you. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email, and be sure to describe your book or include a link to your Readers' Favorite review page or Amazon page.

This author participates in the Readers' Favorite Book Donation Program, which was created to help nonprofit and charitable organizations (schools, libraries, convalescent homes, soldier donation programs, etc.) by providing them with free books and to help authors garner more exposure for their work. This author is willing to donate free copies of their book in exchange for reviews (if circumstances allow) and the knowledge that their book is being read and enjoyed. To begin, click the purple email icon to send this author a private email. Be sure to tell the author who you are, what organization you are with, how many books you need, how they will be used, and the number of reviews, if any, you would be able to provide.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Emily-Jane Hills Orford for Readers' Favorite

It’s the late 1940s in Springfield, Kentucky. Drummer and Bug are sent to their granddaddy’s sharecropper spot of land to spend the summer. Their parents had separated and the two young boys were apart from their other siblings. That didn’t stop the two from having a grand time on the farm. Both fun-loving boys set for a bit of adventure, they fitted into the rural community with ease. As long as they spruced up to attend church on Sunday, they were pretty much left on their own to run about the farm, play with the animals, and visit neighboring children of their age. Unlike many siblings, Drummer and Bug develop a lasting bond, best friends for the most part. The mystery behind certain members of the family, especially their Uncle Ron Ed, have them sneaking around, eavesdropping when the plot thickens. It’s a complicated time for two boys separated from their parents and their siblings and learning, piece by piece, that all is not well in their extended family unit.

Amarius Reed’s middle-grade novel, Pride of the Bluegrass, is a comfortable read. Told in the first-person narrative from Drummer’s point of view, this is a heartwarming story, much like the classic Tom Sawyer series set a hundred years earlier. The dialogue is filled with the vernacular, using the dialect typical of the rural Kentucky area. This gives the story a warm sense of place, setting the stage for authenticity. There is some descriptive narrative, but most of the story is very effectively dialogue-driven. The characters are realistic for the era and place and the young reader will definitely associate with their quirks and insatiable curiosity. This is a sweet story that will stand the test of time, a classic in its own right.