Rage

Australian YA post apocalyptic drama (Seventeen Series book 2)

Young Adult - Sci-Fi
233 Pages
Reviewed on 08/22/2019
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Author Biography

Suzanne was born in Perth Western Australia and as a young adult grew up in the small country town of Tom Price situated in the outback of Western Australia. Her current home is in Perth with her husband, two daughters and cat Abby.
Suzanne has a Bachelor of Science Degree, majoring in Sports Science. Her interests include watching movies, particularly sci- fi, travelling, photography and reading. She also enjoys going to the occasional comic book convention!
Like the young women in her stories, Suzanne has had the opportunity to experience many exciting adventures in her life so far including being part of the Australian Army Reserves, climbing to Mt Everest base camp, descending into one of the pyramids at Giza in Egypt, flying in a hot air balloon over the Valley of the Kings, parachuting from a plane at 12000 feet in York and sitting on the edge of an active volcano on Tanna island in Vanuatu.
Suzanne has won the award for best Sci fi/Horror in an e-book in the New Apple literary awards for her YA novel Seventeen and received a bronze medal from Reader' Favorite International writers’ competition for her children’s novel The Pirate Princess and the Golden Locket.
Suzanne is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and the Australian Society of Authors.
Her published works include;
Seventeen, Rage and The Pirate Princess and the Golden Locket.

    Book Review

Reviewed by K.C. Finn for Readers' Favorite

Rage is a work of post-apocalyptic fiction aimed at young adults and was penned by author Suzanne Lowe. Forming the second novel in the science fiction series Seventeen, we return to the Australian outback where safe haven Jasper’s Bay is now very far from safe indeed. The mutated KV17 virus is hitting all of the older children, and central heroine Lexi fears that she will not have the strength to face a virus that is pulsing in her veins and threatening to invade her mind. With young sibling Hadley to care for, and a whole host of youngsters at the Bay at risk, a powerful and violent rage is building in all of those infected. They must seek out a cure.

The Seventeen series kicks into a whole new overdrive as the action-packed sequel Rage takes to the stage. Whilst I enjoyed book one very much for its innovative take on an age-related apocalypse and the Australian outback cultural setting, this second volume amps up the YA action, sci-fi and even horror elements to create a truly compelling and exciting read from start to end. Lexi’s inner character development is well narrated to combat the struggles she feels, whilst the physical sensations that the infected go through are beautifully and terrifyingly penned to make readers themselves feel the rage building. Visceral, harsh and powerful in its descriptive qualities, the story will have readers’ hearts in their mouths at many moments. Overall, Rage is a superb step-up for author Suzanne Lowe as her series comes into its own.

Samantha Gregory

Rage: Seventeen Series by Suzanne Lowe is the second book in the series, about a world where adults have been wiped out by a virus, leaving only the kids behind. They must learn to survive in this new world. Set in Australia, the teenagers search for somewhere safe, away from gangs. Now the virus has changed, mutated and they are in even more danger. The characters are well developed and believable. Lexi is a great character as she tries to deal with everything that is happening to her. I have not read the first book, but the prologue at the beginning caught me up on the major points, so I understood what was going on. It moved at a decent pace, there was plenty of tension that kept me reading.

Suzanne Lowe has written an entertaining book with Rage, although it is an idea that has been done before a few times and it did remind me a little of the 90's TV show The Tribe. I do like the idea of teenagers having to navigate the world, where there are no adults and no one to help them. It is an interesting scenario, particularly when you think how dependent teenagers are on technology. I think this could do well on the market as young adult sci-fi and young adult dystopia. They are very popular genres right now and it is nice to read something not set in America for once. I would recommend it to dystopian fans.

Grant Leishman

Rage: Seventeen Series Book 2 by Suzanne Lowe takes us into a dystopian environment in Western Australia where the world is now populated by children. The mysterious KV17 virus eighteen months ago had wiped out the entire adult population (everyone over the age of 17). Left to fend for themselves the young teenagers and children attempted to keep life operating and survive in the harsh environment that was the Western Australian outback. Lexi and Hadley, two sisters who had lived in Perth, had escaped the crime-ravaged and vermin-infested city to travel to Jasper’s Bay, a small rural town where they hoped they could link up with other survivors and somehow rebuild their lives. In the first book of this series, there had been a violent confrontation between a bully-gang and the ordinary children that had resulted in deaths and the realization that the now mutated KV17 virus would also infect those children when they turned 17, not killing them but altering their brain chemistry to make them emotionally unstable and dangerous. Against this forbidding backdrop Lexi, Hadley, and their friends have to try to eke out an existence whilst always being cognizant of the dangers of wild teenage enemies and equally dangerous friends.

I found the premise fascinating and this is what drew me into the story. Could a group of children form a cogent society once all the adults had disappeared? In Rage, Lowe presents us with a wide variety of different characters that generally ring true to form; from the “black sheep” of the family in the guise of the evil brother Kevin to his brainless sycophantic girlfriend Cindy, right through to those characters determined to make the most of an impossible situation. I found the story to be well written and the flow and tempo to be totally appropriate to the setting. I particularly enjoyed the clear emotional connection between Braydon and Lexi and wanted very much to see where this would lead. The author’s target market is clearly the YA market; however, this did not stop me from thoroughly enjoying the read. The author clearly knows her environment and this shows through in her work. As a New Zealander, the Aussie slang was second nature to me but even for others it just adds authenticity to the work rather than distracting from it. Lowe did an excellent job of filling in the backstory, so this can be read as a stand-alone book. The ending (although I’m not personally a fan of cliff-hangers) did nicely set up book three and I look forward to reading it.