Scepter


Young Adult - Fantasy - General
226 Pages
Reviewed on 04/26/2014
Buy on Amazon

Author Biography

Scott Collins was born and raised in Southern California but relocated to the Denver area following the birth of the first of his two sons. Days' End was his debut novel and Scepter is the first in a middle grade fantasy series. In addition to writing, he enjoys spending his free time (with two kids that's not much time) running and cycling. Please feel free to visit his website at scottlcollins.com.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Barbara Garcia for Readers' Favorite

Scepter by Scott L. Collins is the story of Daniel and his younger brother Aidan. King Argyle's soldiers are on the move, taking parents and older children into slavery and forcing them to work in the mines. Having come of the proper age, Daniel knows that they will be coming for him soon, and he frets over what will become of his brother who is a few years younger. But Daniel and Aidan have a secret. Since having a sickness called Witch's Breath when they were younger, they have developed special abilities. Daniel can move faster than the eye can see, and Aidan can communicate with animals and even turn into any animal he's shared water with. It's Aidan that saves his brother from being taken by the king's men. Calling on the animals in the area, he's able to defeat the men with the help of the animals. After the battle, they discover a girl in chains cowering near a tree. Once they free her, she's determined to go back home and get her younger sister. And so it begins. The three set out, determined not only to save Lilly, but ultimately all the slaves taken by the king.

Scepter by Scott L. Collins is an endearing story. As an adult, it was gripping for me because I worried about these young people barely into their teens going up against hardened soldiers. But also against goblins, gnomes, and even a dragon at one point. Their encounters with a unicorn, fairies, and a centaur clan deeply enriched the mythical tones of this story. Scott easily made me care about these young people, and that speaks very well of his excellent, yet subtle, character building. I especially appreciated that this book was error free and well written. I highly recommend this book to younger and older readers alike. I look forward to reading Book 2 in this series!