Sweet Water

Birds of a Feather Book 2

Young Adult - Romance
298 Pages
Reviewed on 06/07/2017
Buy on Amazon

Author Biography

The proper way to put it here would probably be to describe how I love to play with our two big dogs, adore my fantastic daughters and how much I love to read.

Another way would be to use my imagination and then I would be a super powerful warrior woman, think Xena the warrior princess (though with less tacky clothes). Or when I think of it, maybe I’m actually more of a Hercule Poirot (sans the suit and moustache). Or maybe I’m like Aragorn, strong and cool and then I might get to meet Gandalf! Or I could be Bella’s pretty cousin and snap Jacob up in a second (yeah, I’m so not team Edward), or wait, maybe I could be like one of them heroines in historical novels who swoon all the time. I’ve always wanted to swoon…

Well, I guess you get how my mind is working (or not working, some say). Anyways, I like to write. Stories, adventures, romantic and happy stuff mixed up with sorrow and hardship, and bit of laughter here and there because the way I see it – life is way too short to go around feeling grumpy.

    Book Review

Reviewed by Christian Sia for Readers' Favorite

Sweet Water by Lena North is book two in the Birds of a Feather series, a romance that is masterfully crafted for young readers, with memorable and realistic characters. Doctor and engineer Jiminella “Jinx” Sweetwater is a self-made woman, a character who has survived on her own and on her own terms. The story begins with her disappointment at a date that goes awfully wrong and quickly moves through a break-in at her condo and her flight to a little hamlet by the sea. The simple life of a village has its own challenges, but when Dante comes along, Jinx feels as if he is the one who has finally broken through her defenses. Can she let him in?

Jiminella is a character who caught my attention so much for one thing: she is a huge success, but she suffers from a terrible loneliness, an incapacity to freely connect with those around her, perhaps because she is a genius. One immediately feels the vacuum within her and the subdued restlessness that could ruin her life. I enjoyed her inner journey and how she comes to allow herself to be affected by Dante. I was able to connect with this character on many levels; she is real, a gifted woman who has her own share of difficulties dealing with people. The plot is well-paced and the conflict — mostly psychological — moves quickly into a climax, and the denouement was just as satisfactory. Sweet Water is a character-driven story that will appeal to readers of different ages. It is incredibly absorbing and highly entertaining.