The Epistles of Jesus


Fiction - Historical - Personage
390 Pages
Reviewed on 02/11/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Vincent Dublado for Readers' Favorite

A thought-provoking book that alternates between the past and the present, The Epistles of Jesus by Bayard Hollingsworth operates on the premise that what if Christ’s teachings are discovered to be inconsistent with long-standing doctrine? And so it conceives a gripping thriller that takes you into different time periods. In the past, Aulus Septimius, a devout and staunch scholar in 2nd Century Egypt, has taken great measures to prevent the Epistles of Jesus from being destroyed by forces pursuing their own goals. Septimius’ family is descended from Theophilus, the man to whom Jesus had written a letter. Letters contained in four randomly sized parchment pieces are being sought after by religious entities for their own gain. In the present, Alex Georgios, chief technology officer of Protocomm, takes the monopoly in space-based data management. Yet he needs to watch his back from men like Yevgeny Lyakhovsky, who has a malicious interest in his company. As the modern world jousts for control over global information, the Epistles have found a new threat that could expose the contents of Christ’s letters.

Bayard Hollingsworth gives a solid cliffhanger as The Epistles of Jesus concludes on what yet remains to be seen. It takes aim in the thriller subgenre about ancient artifacts that can prove devastating once revealed. This is no cheap thriller when you think that it challenges your preconceived notions about Christian doctrines. This is a work of fiction, but Hollingsworth’s creative license attempts to explore an angle on a sensitive topic where, up to now, we have limited information. In between the two time periods, you also get fragmented glimpses of the life of the Messiah, which further piques your curiosity to keep reading. The Epistles of Jesus may well give Dan Brown a run for his money.