The Girl From Berlin

War Criminal's Widow

Fiction - Historical - Event/Era
377 Pages
Reviewed on 02/12/2016
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Deborah Lloyd for Readers' Favorite

Ellie Midwood continues her thrilling The Girl From Berlin trilogy with War Criminal’s Widow. As the Nazi regime is struggling to prolong its grip in Europe, the story of Annalise, her husband Heinrich, and her lover, Dr. Ernst Kaltenbrunner, the Chief of the Reich Main Security Office, continues. Annalise and Heinrich are German, working as counterintelligence agents for the American OSS office within the enemy organization. The Third Reich, while often viewed as a formidable organization where all members embraced one goal, is portrayed in a different light in this book. The personal misgivings and individual goals of the officers of the Third Reich lend to an understanding that even such a malevolent force is comprised of conflicted individuals, sometimes doubting its own organization’s goals. Finally, the war is over, Annalise and Heinrich’s last days in their native homeland are harrowing, while an escape is planned by the appreciative American OSS office.

Learning more about the inner workings of the Nazi regime within the triangular relationship of three main characters is certainly an engaging and intriguing process. The Girl From Berlin: War Criminal’s Widow by Ellie Midwood is a suspense-filled, page-turning historical novel with many twists and turns. Ms. Midwood is able to develop complex characters and shows that few people are all-good, or all-evil, especially when living in unusual circumstances. However, when the war ends, the consequences of previous actions remain. This is a thought-provoking novel about a very difficult time in the last century. It is not always an easy read, but it will certainly give the reader much to contemplate.