The Teacher

How to Survive the Teaching Profession Without Losing Your S**t (In Their Shoes Book 1)

Fiction - Humor/Comedy
207 Pages
Reviewed on 02/24/2017
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Ankita Shukla for Readers' Favorite

So you think you can be a teacher? You would be forced to reconsider your choice when you are done reading The Teacher: How to Survive the Teaching Profession Without Losing Your S**t (In Their Shoes Book 1) by Andrew Mackay. Joy Attwood, a journalist working on her documentary "In their Shoes" series, spends one day with Rachel Weir, Maxwell Gooder's teacher of English and Business Studies. Her mission is to observe a teacher's typical day of school; little does she know that this typical day is anything but "typical." As if on the cue, hell breaks loose and everything goes wrong. Beginning from Joy's visitor's badge (that reads Joyce Altwild) and ending with an unexpected announcement from Rachel, everything falls apart. Rachel's class is full of giggly, out-of-control, self-absorbed, and devilish characters. Joy's whole take on teaching changes drastically by the end of the day. The profession that she assumed to be highly moralistic and noble proves to be anything but those things.

Andrew Mackay's satirical and realistic manner of writing has the power to suck a reader deep into the book and leave them wanting more. Joy's innocence and Rachel's aggressive remarks could not have been described better. The events are very real and relatable. Haven't we all seen students' inner artists come alive in the school washrooms in the form of insulting remarks about their teachers? If you haven't, be prepared to be shocked by the vivid description of the same on Maxwell Gooder's washroom walls. I would recommend this book to readers who enjoy taking a sneak peek inside another profession. The language tends to be abusive here and there. Having said that, the events that lead the characters to use the offensive language justify the usage. If, as a reader, you find a pinch of humor entertaining amidst a world of chaos, then this book is for you.