I Can Do All Things

Lessons in Personal Christian Life Management

Non-Fiction - Self Help
82 Pages
Reviewed on 04/23/2017
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Danita Dyess for Readers' Favorite

I Can Do All Things: Lessons in Personal Christian Life Management by Stephen Kurtzahn was written based on one idea: Self-help and motivational books, specifically Stephen Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, are founded on Bible-based principles. In 1987, the author worked for Dean Witter Reynolds, a brokerage firm, and received the Franklin Planning system to organize his activities. That served as an introduction to Covey's 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and Kurtzahn's discernment of Covey's principle's compared to God's Word. The Lutheran pastor cites Romans 1:20 to explain man's natural understanding of virtues like fairness, integrity and excellence. Kurtzahn does agree with Covey about the fact that doing something in less time does not mean you have accomplished the right thing. As a Christian, the right thing starts with "delighting in the law of the Lord," applying the SMART method, knowing the difference between gratitude and thankfulness, and acknowledging that what God ordains is always good.

The cover of the hiker facing the snow-packed mountain was apt. I Can Do All Things: Lessons in Personal Christian Life Management raised a question I have contemplated as I have weighed the content of bestselling books against the God-inspired words in the Bible. True North Principles was my favorite chapter. This spiritual guide is only 12 chapters and contains 180 pages filled with scriptures and sections for questions and actions. I Can Do All Things is highly recommended.