Slave of Mickle Fortune

Life So Fickle, Love So Full and Fortune Mickle

Fiction - Historical - Event/Era
392 Pages
Reviewed on 02/26/2013
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Author Biography

John D'Mille, country boy, carpenter's
trainee, teacher, academic tutor and writer in fiction, history and legal theory. Childhood polio, his first physical calamity, forged the map of his life, dictating directions. Polio victim Franklin Delano Roosevelt set the pace for what is possible. John D’Mille has long been in awe of his courage.
A new edition nearly ready for release.

Book Review
Reviewed by Anne Boling for Readers' Favorite
John D’Mille shares the exciting history of the great land of Australia in his fictional account titled “Slave of Mickle Fortune: Life So Fickle, Love So Full and Fortune Mickle

    Book Review

Reviewed by Debra Gaynor for Readers' Favorite

John D’Mille shares the exciting history of the great land of Australia in his fictional account titled “Slave of Mickle Fortune: Life So Fickle, Love So Full and Fortune Mickle". Our tale begins in 1879 at Lake Eustone. A train rolls into the station and a prisoner arrives in chains. Seamus Bluey O’Toole was a mere child. He was a scrawny, grubby boy who had faced much cruelty in his short life. From the moment Lilly and Arthur Evans saw their young charge their hearts melted. The Evans were kind and caring people and after a time they adopted Seamus. So begins the tale. “Slave of Mickle Fortune” continues to show what life would be like during that era. Seamus inherited the estate of his adoptive parents. Could Helena truly love him or was she only in love with his monetary worth? Would the murderous gold fields police sergeant, Whithers, succeed in governing their lives by fear and treachery?

John D’Mille is an extremely talented author. He has created a fictional account that could easily be true. His descriptions are vivid allowing me to see the scenes as they are played out on the stage in my mind’s eye. I found the history to be informative, fascinating and generally mesmerizing. D’Mille added just the right amount of humor to lighten this tale. There are several noteworthy characters. Of course I would say that Seamus is a well-developed character. From the moment Lilly was introduced, I liked her and her husband; they exhibited traits that demonstrated their compassion and caring nature. It was exciting to watch the relationships surrounding Seamus develop. In this charming tale readers witness a young boy, a slave, become a fascinating young man capable of taking what life has dealt him and making the most of it. This is a charming read.

Maria Beltran

Seamus Kieran O’Toole is but a young Irish orphan when he arrives in Australia in 1879 as a prisoner, for stealing bread for his hungry siblings. As punishment for his crime, he is sold as an indentured labourer to wealthy farmers, a couple named Lily and Arthur Evans. They are heartbroken upon seeing the state the child was in: filthy, wounded, and in chains, having suffered abuse and neglect throughout the one hundred seven days he had spent traveling to Australia. Having lost their son to the British Invasion of the Hindu Kush in Afghanistan, they adopt Seamus as their own and they make him heir to the family’s wealth. It is here that life begins to improve for Seamus, with new friendships and relationships forged. However, demonic Senior Constable Whithers would not forget Seamus’s past and would stop at nothing to satisfy his jealousy and lust for gold.

"Slave of Mickle Fortune" begins on a hopeful note, and the kindness of the community that saves Seamus from his past is very heartwarming. It is this strong foundation of genuine love and care that makes him ready to face challenges ahead. The protagonists and supporting characters are easily likable, created with a kind of lightheartedness and optimism that not only is used to help the characters through the conflicts they encounter, but it also balances out the darker milieu of the book. This novel is a charming and fascinating piece of historical fiction, one that will leave readers warmed by the thought that love triumphs over evil.