The Genetic God


Christian - Fiction
399 Pages
Reviewed on 07/27/2021
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    Book Review

Reviewed by Divine Zape for Readers' Favorite

The Genetic God by Ian Minielly is an intriguing tale that features a compelling theme, one that will be delightful for Christian readers. In this story, the author asks the question: what if there was evidence in human DNA that scientifically proved the existence of God? In a world where powerful governments and politicians are bent on using this lack of faith to manipulate and control citizens, a startling discovery is made that strongly proves the existence of God. But will the State of Washington allow this kind of proof to be shared with the entire world, knowing how it will affect Christians, non-Christians, Jews, Muslims, and everyone else? It is a discovery that will not prove the existence of God to all skeptics, but one that will prove that staunch skeptics are wrong. As Thomas and Cliff and their circle work to ferment the findings of their research, forces emerge that will do everything to impede their efforts.

I loved The Genetic God and I rejoiced at the ingenuity in the plot and the brilliance in articulating a theme as relevant as the connection between science and religion. I had many questions racing through my mind - not that I don’t believe in the existence of God - but a breakthrough that can present the evidence of God in an undisputed manner can change the world. In this book, the author makes a powerful case for the existence of God and readers will understand that the proof of God’s existence is in what is not scientifically proven. There are always instances of mystery where science fails to give an explanation, and this work of speculative science fiction invites readers into a debate between faith and reason. As one reads on, following the well-developed characters, the truths about God are laid bare. It is indisputable that faith starts where science sets its boundaries. Author Ian Minielly created wonderfully written characters and I adored them as they navigated a world filled with mystery and events that awakened them in extraordinary ways. My favorite character was Thomas, a convert who becomes a strong proponent of Christianity. The Genetic God is an intriguing story with strong themes of religion, science, and politics. Balanced and deftly written, it is a tale as inspirational as any can be.

Vincent Dublado

The Genetic God by Ian Minielly is provocative and entertaining. It contains accusations against the government about a cover-up of the discovery of the true nature of God. The storyline provides a simple rationale for the denial: Leaders of governments couldn’t stand the thought of God, let alone scientific proof that God exists. It is a discovery that will finally reconcile science and theology, but arbitrary powers decide the world is not ready for the truth. A top official knows who killed Kennedy. He knows everything about Roswell and the location of aliens in custody. He even held the Soviet nuclear codes in his hands at one point. But the information he received about the Prophets is something he considers the most dangerous and most classified of all for it will destroy his country and the age-old beliefs of his fellow citizens.

Written with grace and style, I like The Genetic God, even if the plot runs in the same vein as novels that point fingers at religious controversies like The Da Vinci Code. With intriguing and absorbing content, Ian Minielly brings tone and style and a sense of intrigue that is fascinating to follow. He begins his narrative with the world thrown into bitter turmoil, and Israel scooping up all promising scientific leads. You might think the evidence presented may not sound dangerous at all, but the story works as it constantly turns the wheels of conspiracy and danger. The secret needs to be protected, for the world may not be ready to understand how God leaves His mark on our genetic code. The Genetic God is a highly entertaining work of fiction that will appeal to anyone who enjoys intriguing stories with a Christian foundation.

Tammy Ruggles

The Genetic God by Ian Minielly is an intriguing Christian-based novel that could steer you toward a belief or renewed belief in the existence of God. This plot revolves around people caught up in a global controversy after discovering proof of God's existence in their bodies. Though the evidence has been there all along, scientists just weren't aware of it. But now that the proof is revealed, the powers that control the world will do anything to keep this information from getting out to the masses. What is science to do when faced with the reality of God?

This is the kind of book most Christians would like to see made into a movie. The story is interesting, entertaining, and plot-driven. The characters are relatable, and it does make you take a closer look at the science-versus-God debate. Besides appealing to Christians or the curious, it most likely will appeal to the conspiracy crowd too, as it includes the Kennedy assassination, Roswell, and ancient biblical prophecies. If intrigue is your favorite genre, this book is a perfect match for you. It covers education, economics, the military, and politics as well; so it's pretty ambitious in scope. Minielly writes with confidence and purpose, steering the plot and the characters precisely where he wants them to go, and in a convincing way. As you read, you get the feeling he really enjoys what he's writing about, enjoys entertaining you, and you are likely to become an instant fan. Fans of QAnon and religious or conspiracy-themed books will become immersed in The Genetic God by Ian Minielly.

Romuald Dzemo

The Genetic God by Ian Minielly is a book with strong historical references and a plot that is as well-imagined as it is intriguing. The author opens the narrative with historical and geopolitical commentaries, exploring events that shaped contemporary geopolitical influences, such as the September 11, 2001 bombing, the involvement of the United States in Iraq and Pakistan, and European business interests in Africa. While world governments find every reason to justify acts of terrorism, abuse, and control over populations, something very powerful is happening: a breakthrough in science that offers tangible proof of the existence of God in an indisputable manner. It is in human DNA. This information could bridge the gap between science and religion and crystallize the biblical and scientific foundations of faith, and governments don’t like that. Can the protagonists of this inspiring tale conclude their research and use the information to strengthen faith in God, or will they be disrupted by powers that are only too happy to promote and use religious skepticism to control peoples and nations?

I was sucked into the story immediately as I followed the interesting descriptions of the Great Game and the role the United States plays in international politics (one that doesn’t make it admirable). Ian Minielly's story begins with action, presenting the military activity of Sergeant Mayor and his team, but I became most fascinated as I read about men of faith like Thomas and Clifford and the work they did. In this narrative, a place with little consequence quickly becomes a beacon of faith, pulling many people into its bosom. I have read a lot of publications that explore the proverbial argument between the God of science and religion, and The Genetic God, though a novel, takes the argument to a whole new high. It is cunningly plotted, deftly written, and features characters that are compelling. This is a thought-provoking novel that offers a vivid portrait of the power of faith and the place science has in our understanding of the mysteries of God. It is wonderfully touching and it will stimulate the intellect of readers while warming their hearts.