Oblivion

Ad Magnificum Volumina (Volume 1)

Fiction - Science Fiction
397 Pages
Reviewed on 11/06/2018
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Grant Leishman for Readers' Favorite

Author Jordan G. Farrell takes readers on a fantastic journey through both time and space in his epic science fiction adventure, Oblivion: Ad Magnificum Volumina. Husband and wife Justin and Jessica Forsythe are important people in the settlement of Gabrellium, a human outpost on Europa, one of Jupiter’s moons. Earth had long been destroyed by man’s folly (the purge) and those few survivors set out millennia ago to find habitable lands to develop in and flourish. Justin is the head of security and responsible for protecting the ice-workers who are required to terra-form the massive ice coating that covers the surface of Europa. It is within these ice structures that humanity now survives. Jessica is a scientist responsible for many of the cutting-edge developments on Gabrellium. When the impossible happens and a baby is naturally born to a people that, for millennia now, have produced offspring by atomic printing them, Justin, Jessica and the settlement’s leadership are clearly concerned. This single event sends them on a search for the truth that will ultimately make them rethink everything they’ve ever believed in.

I love science fiction and usually I prefer more of the fiction with only a background of the science. In this case, Jordan G. Farrell has created something unique and splendid in Oblivion: Ad Magnificum Volumina. The story itself is fantastic enough on its own, but what I found, as a non-physicist (in fact a total science dummy), was that even the complicated science seemed to make some sort of sense to me, which is as big a tribute as I could pay to this or any author. What I would usually skim over, with most of it flying over my head, I found myself reading avidly and trying to assimilate the science behind it. But, this is much more than just a science fiction adventure; at its core this book is a scathing examination of humanity, its excesses, its self-destructive bent and its sheer bloody-mindedness. Much of the story is action orientated and reads almost like a “boy’s own” adventure story, which is marvellous, and yet lurking in the background are deep philosophical arguments that the reader cannot help but get drawn into. This is one of the best science fiction books I have read in a very long time and I cannot recommend it highly enough to not just fans of the genre, but to all action/adventure junkies and those that like a bit of deep-thinking “meat” in their reading. My biggest pleasure was to see that Farrell left the ending open for the possibility of a sequel. I look forward to it and hope he writes it.