Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex


Fiction - Short Story/Novela
111 Pages
Reviewed on 06/12/2019
Buy on Amazon

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    Book Review

Reviewed by Charles Remington for Readers' Favorite

The fascinating book Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex certainly lives up to its title. Written by a part-time Uber driver, it chronicles conversations or events, which the author freely admits have been dramatized to some extent, that have taken place during his shifts. It is obvious from the text that the author, AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim, is an educated man of Middle Eastern origin. His observations are pithy and revealing and provide a rare opportunity of looking at our troubled society through the eyes of a recent immigrant. It brings into sharp focus the cultural differences that run deep in our Western, multi-racial, multi-cultural societies. The short stories vary in length as one would expect, covering a disparate range of subject matter from the harrowing tales of oppression and abuse of women in many parts of the Middle East and Africa, to cheating congressmen. There are also amusing anecdotes of the type that I am sure many cab drivers will have experienced during their shifts - the drunk and stoned passengers and the marketers desperate to scam an unsuspecting driver.

The following words from a discussion with a passenger about people blindly and unquestioningly following the directions of the Bible prompted a good deal of thought and reflection: "In Islam also, some people do the same, while others overdo it and that sometimes kills them or kills their ideas about Islam. They will follow some interpretation of Islam by some scholars who wrote some books a thousand years ago, letting dead people lead them while they want everyone to be dead like their scholars and kill whoever is in disagreement with them. That is so dangerous when dead people lead the living people: it is exactly what is so-called terrorism. All we need is to make these people follow a living idea that people can promote. " What an interesting concept – should we allow ourselves to be led by dead people? What about science, the law, the constitution?

I was greatly taken with this book and there is a certain freshness and honesty to be found in its pages. The early chapters in particular, where several young women passengers describe their horrific lives before arriving in the USA, are deeply shocking. But what I liked most was the unusual point of view, the experience of seeing for the first time a drunken girl urinating in public or a congressman being plied with sexual favors, described by someone from a very different culture. I was impressed by the many quotes and asides. From the poet Rumi to Ernest Hemingway, it displayed Abuhuraira Z. Abelhalim’s breadth of knowledge and experience. I found Uber You an excellent read, informative, edifying and enlightening. It deserves a broad readership. A great book for anyone wanting to take an alternative look at the way we live today.

Samantha Gregory

Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex by AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim is a collection of tales from the author who once worked as an Uber driver. In this book, he shares various stories he has heard over his time as a driver. Each tale attempts to look deeper at humans as a species, our strengths, weaknesses and how our emotions can shape our lives. One story follows a young woman who believes her boyfriend has dumped her over their religious differences; the driver then compares love to religion. He has some interesting ideas, although they don't always hit the mark.

AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim has created an interesting read in Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex. I personally am fascinated by the human psyche and places like the inside of an Uber cab where people feel confident enough to tell the driver their problems, knowing that it is unlikely they will ever see them again. The author uses a lot of metaphors and comparisons to movies and famous quotes to paint a picture. At times I felt it got a little off topic, but overall I think that the stories are interesting and varied. I'm not sure where it would find a place in the market, but it would be of interest to certain readers, particularly those who enjoy non-fiction stories. Uber is still a relatively new thing and I believe there is still great interest in it. I wouldn't be surprised if there ended up being a TV series following a similar format.

Sarah Stuart

I was curious about “Uber You”; its literal meaning is an outstanding or extreme example of you, though “Uber” is actually a reference to the author’s spell as a driver for Uber, a modern form of taxi service. This collection of stories is told from the author’s point of view as the driver. All of them, as the title leads you to expect, are varied by different passengers' takes on the four subjects, and I couldn’t help wondering just how much the fiction is based on that carefully-disguised fact. Whatever the truth, I read them all at one sitting, and I recommend that you do the same to gain the full effect. AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim himself, or his alter ego, becomes very real.

Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex by AbuHuraira Z Abdelhalim is a collection of short stories that are captivating because they are both different from anything I had read before and believable. They are well-written, with excellent descriptions of the Uber driver’s surroundings, his thoughts, and his characters. All readers will find favorites they will return to read again. Mine were Fake Happiness and Looking for a New Identity, two which show women from similar backgrounds reacting in totally different ways; A Fight for a Pretty Girl that seemed so real, and Pleasure for Sale by a Male because it demonstrates a culture clash. “Stories” is not quite the right word; they read like a selection of articles with commentary, and I loved them.

Gisela Dixon

Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex by AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim is a fiction book based on the author’s own real-life experiences. In this book, which is essentially a collection of short stories, the author has drawn from his own experiences as an Uber cab driver and the various stories he heard and people he met from all walks of life on his job. Often, people share more about their lives with an anonymous taxi driver than with their closest friends or family, and this is the basis of the book. The stories are inspired by conversations with people on all topics such as jobs, money, love life, relationships, marriage, immigration, heartbreak, and even discussions on life, death, and metaphysical subjects.

I enjoyed reading Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money and Sex and found it to be a short and fun read. I liked that it is a reflection of real life and found myself drawn to hearing more about people talking and sharing even some personal aspects of their lives in a candid manner. AbuHuraira writes in a witty and yet common sense kind of tone and rightly points out the futility of labeling people or events as good or bad. Disagreements and conflict, especially on the basis of things such as religion, race, or gender, are destructive and pointless and this fact comes through in the stories. There is enough human suffering in the world naturally without adding to it by artificial means such as religious bias and this book helps to bring home this fact. Overall, this is an enjoyable book which is both fun and serious at times, something which readers will enjoy!

Tracy Young

AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim is an I.T. engineer who works as an Uber driver in Washington DC. Finding himself in debt, he uses the money he makes from his driving as his personal credit card. The customers he picks up are varied and from all walks of life. Pretty girls fighting over a rich boy and getting caught short. Women who have escaped from deeply troubling backgrounds. Older women with young lovers and aging congressmen with a younger girlfriend, the city of DC has them all. Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money, and Sex is a fascinating insight into the life of an Uber driver and the passengers he ferries around. Their stories range from the deeply distressing to the humorous and ridiculous, a true insight into life.

The title of the book, Uber You Tales of God, Love, Money, and Sex tells the reader what the book is about but gives no indication of the thoughtful insights of the author. AbuHuraira Z. Abdelhalim is incredibly eloquent and uses quotations and literature to enhance his stories beautifully. He is brutally honest and frank about the passengers he encounters and tells their stories with aplomb. This is a true reflection of a city that houses both immigrants and Americans from all walks of life, students, prostitutes, and lonely people just looking for love. Religion, sex, money, and love are all laid bare in the back of a Toyota Corolla, a tale of our age and a great read. The only concern about this book is that it will leave you wanting more! More Uber stories, please!